ENVIRONMENT BILL: DELIVERING A BIODIVERSITY NET GAIN

SANDY FISHPOOL
SANDY FISHPOOL
ENVIRONMENT BILL: DELIVERING A BIODIVERSITY NET GAIN

ENVIRONMENT BILL:
DELIVERING A BIODIVERSITY NET GAIN

ENVIRONMENT BILL: DELIVERING A BIODIVERSITY NET GAIN

ENVIRONMENT BILL:
DELIVERING A BIODIVERSITY NET GAIN

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It’s now a little over a week since the Environment Bill was introduced. This includes a requirement for all new planning consents to include a condition requiring a 10% biodiversity net gain. In other words, those building need to demonstrate an uplift in biodiversity on or near the site, enhancing natural habitats to create lasting benefits both for wildlife and for people.

Even before the Environment Bill, Rural Solutions has presented the benefits of biodiversity net gain across many different sites working with the landscape team creates planting, water sources and habitats that are carefully designed to complement the architecture as well as the natural surroundings.

For example, the ongoing blog on a consented paragraph 80e house in the Blackdown Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, which Rural Solutions achieved consent for shows recent habitat creation. Whilst in the initial stages these ‘scrapes’ being dug into the field perhaps don’t look like the most attractive things in the world, they are carefully formed shallow ponds that are lined with site-won clay to waterproof them and over time these will be a rich habitat for plants and insects. These wet but ecologically rich areas are an archetypal feature of the Blackdown Hill’s spring line. This is a fantastic example of how a development can bring about wider environmental benefits through land-use changes.

If you would like to understand more about Biodiversity Net Gain and how it could benefit you and your upcoming development, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

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