PLANNING NEWS: PARA 79 SUCCESS AT APPEAL FOR HOME IN COTSWOLDS AONB

PLANNING NEWS: PARA 79 SUCCESS AT APPEAL FOR HOME IN COTSWOLDS AONB

PLANNING NEWS:
PARA 79 SUCCESS AT APPEAL FOR HOME IN COTSWOLDS AONB

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We are delighted to have secured planning consent at appeal for a new country house in the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

Despite an initially comprehensive submission and strong support of the South West Design Review Panel, the planning application was refused by Cotswold District Council, without sound grounds.

Confident in the merits of the scheme, based on our work across the country in this policy area, we advanced the scheme to the appeal stage. We worked closely with the council and project team to advance a comprehensive appeal to the Planning Inspectorate.

The appeal was allowed with the Inspector commending the design qualities of the scheme; acknowledging that country houses make a strong contribution to the Cotswold AONB and that it is appropriate that new houses approved under paragraph 79 should be visible within the landscape. This is only the second para 79e scheme approved in this area and the first in over two decades.

We are delighted to have achieved consent here after a frustrating first hurdle. However, the work we did for the appeal demonstrates that the first decision is not always the end of the road and, if anything, further magnified the merits of the scheme. This particular area is a very challenging designation due to its popular location, so we are really pleased with the final outcome.

The new home has been designed by architects, Loyn + Co and landscape architects, SEED Landscape Design, for a 680sqm scheme on a sloping field on the edge of a village, within the Cotswold AONB.

The client’s brief was functional yet aspirational. The relationships between inside and outside played a prominent part.

A ‘fabric first’ approach was taken to the design and construction, to produce a highly insulated, well-sealed building envelope, working in conjunction with appropriate support systems, including ground source heating laid beneath the new meadow, and solar thermal panels on the roof and photo-voltaic panels, to be located remotely from the dwelling, south facing in the zone adjacent to the proposed Gatehouse.

Material references have also been taken from the defining characteristics of the local vernacular, and these have been incorporated in a contemporary way. For example, the proposed use in selected areas of Cotswold Stone, often to be draped with climbing planting - a common feature in the village.

Working with the landscape, this is a carefully considered project, taking into account a variety of factors to arrive at a contextual, rational and joyful solution.’

Work is not expected to start on site until spring 2021.

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